CERTAIN WEBSITES HAVE BEEN ESSENTIAL FOR THIS BOOK. SOME FOCUS ON MARINE LIFE, OTHERS LOOK AT ECOLOGY AND SOME AT SEAFOOD.
HERE'S MY LIST - AND A LINK TO A RADIO PROGRAMME I MADE ABOUT FISH.



MARINE LIFE
To find out all you need to know about any marine creature here are the websites I visited most.

Fishbase
fishbase.sinica.edu.tw
31,900 species, 281,400 common names, 49,800 pictures.

SeaLifeBase
www.sealifebase.org
113,500 species, 24,700  common names, 9,500 pictures.

Crusteanet
crustacea.net
Crustaceans of the world.

Cephbase
www.cephbase.utmb.edu
Cephalopods (octopus, squid, cuttlefish and nautilus).

Fisheries Global Information System (FIGIS) www.fao.org/fishery/factsheets
Fisheries and Aquaculture Fact Sheets,
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™
www.iucnredlist.org
International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources.


SUSTAINABLE SEAFOOD

Monterey Bay Aquarium
montereybayaquarium.org
Seafood Watch. Pocket guides, species fact sheets, restaurant and retailers, links to many other global resources.

Greenpeace Ocean species guide
www.greenpeace.org.uk/oceans/species-guide.
It’s always worth checking fish-to-avoid lists from organisations that have no link to the retail world.

Marine Stewardship Council
www.msc.org
The MSC run a certification and ecolabelling program for sustainable seafood.

Marine Conservation Society
www.fishonline.org
Fishonline website can help you identify which fish are from well managed sources and/or caught using methods that minimise damage to marine wildlife and habitats.

World Wildlife Fund
www.wwf.org.uk




Jake's Sustainable Fish
The Food Programme BBC Radio 4. 2010

DOWNLOAD THE PODCAST ...

'Artist Jake Tilson began writing a seafood cookbook as an attempt to overcome his squeamishness about fish. It worked - he's now passionate about cooking and eating fish. But midway through the process he hit a black hole - it might be healthy and taste great, but with the vast majority of fisheries in the world fully or over exploited, should we be eating fish at all? His previous exhibition, A Net of Eels, has convinced him that he had eaten his last eel: would fish prove to be the same?

Answering that question took Jake on a journey through hundreds of scientific papers and books by the world's experts, visiting fish markets and talking to fish buyers around the world. His quest culminated at the Seaweb Seafood Choices Summit earlier this year, the world's biggest annual seafood gathering, where industry, science, fishermen, NGOs, government, and the odd chef, were all brought together in Paris to discuss sustainable seafood and good practice.

Through the fish market of Rungis, the streets of Paris, and the conference halls, Jake asks the experts what they mean by "sustainable fishing", and how cooks everywhere can find it, speaking to conference keynote speaker Professor Daniel Pauly, the community supported fishery from Maine, and UK restaurateur Caroline Bennett owner of sushi restaurant Moshi Moshi.'